Twenty Year Medal Table for Hockey

Summer Olympic Games 1996 – 2012

Netherlands womens hockey celebrate - 2012 Olympics

India once dominated Olympic men’s hockey but, since artificial turf was introduced in 1976, it has won just one medal, gold in the heavily boycotted Games of 1980. It could not afford to replace its grass pitches and so its slower, dribbling game failed to evolve.

In contrast, the Netherlands thrived on the new surface, developing a fast passing game which is believed to have inspired the Total Football of Johan Cruyff and his teammates. In Rio, its women will be aiming for a record third gold in a row, but they will have some way to go to catch the six consecutive titles of the Indian men between 1928 and 1956.

This year’s big story could be the return of India to the podium, having finished second in the Champions Trophy and third in 2015’s World League. The comeback of Ireland’s men has been even longer-awaited – their last appearance was in the Olympics of 1908.

G S B
Netherlands 4 3 2 9
Australia 3 0 4 7
Germany 3 0 1 4
Argentina 0 2 2 4
South Korea 0 2 0 2
Spain 0 2 0 2
China 0 1 0 1
Great Britain 0 0 1 1

Next: It’s no shock that Japan leads the judo medals but second place is more surprising

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2 thoughts on “Twenty Year Medal Table for Hockey

  1. During the 2012 Olympics my mum commented that the GB hockey teams used to have a lot of people of Indian heritage back in the day (she probably meant 80s) but didn’t any more. So what’s the story there? With the Indian team not doing so well anymore second and third generation not inspired to take up the sport?

    Loving the blog…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks Lauren. Interesting question.

    British, and particularly English, hockey is remorselessly upper middle class. Most members of the GB squad are from the South East, counties like Kent, Sussex, Surrey, Berkshire and Hampshire, the same places where most of the famous clubs are based. This trend existed in 1988 but it has become even more pronounced since, and these are not parts of the country which have large Indian populations.

    Like

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