Twenty Year Medal Table for Taekwondo

Summer Olympic Games 1996 – 2012

Anne-Caroline Graffe 2012

Despite its origins in South Korea, which still heads the medal table by a large margin, taekwondo has done a particularly good job of spreading itself around the world. The eight gold medallists in London were all from different countries, and 21 nations from Afghanistan to Gabon kicked up precious metal. Even the South Pacific was able to get into the act with France’s silver medallist, Anne-Caroline Graffe, who hails from Tahiti.

Taekwondo is proving popular in Latin America, notably Mexico. The sport is so big in Honduras that its former president was a black belt, though it is still without a medal.

Chinese Taipei attended ten Olympic Games between 1956 and 2000 and failed to win gold, but then managed it twice in taekwondo, ten minutes apart, on 26 August 2004.

G S B
South Korea 10 2 2 14
China 5 1 2 8
United States 2 2 4 8
Chinese Taipei 2 1 5 8
Mexico 2 1 3 6
Iran 2 1 2 5
Turkey 1 3 2 6
Greece 1 3 0 4
Spain 1 3 0 4
Cuba 1 2 2 5
Italy 1 1 1 3
Australia 1 1 0 2
Great Britain 1 0 2 3
Argentina 1 0 0 1
Serbia 1 0 0 1
France 0 2 4 6
Norway 0 2 0 2
Russia 0 1 2 3
Thailand 0 1 2 3
Canada 0 1 1 2
Germany 0 1 1 2
Dominican Republic 0 1 0 1
Gabon 0 1 0 1
Vietnam 0 1 0 1
Croatia 0 0 3 3
Afghanistan 0 0 2 2
Venezuela 0 0 2 2
Brazil 0 0 1 1
Colombia 0 0 1 1
Egypt 0 0 1 1
Japan 0 0 1 1
Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1
Nigeria 0 0 1 1

Next: The big names of tennis have had Olympic glory but there are some surprises too

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Twenty Year Medal Table for Taekwondo

  1. After not being selected to represent GB at London 2012, Aaron Cook will be competing for Moldova in Rio. According to Wikipedia this is result of some Moldovan billionaire with an interest in TKD, rather than Cook having any Moldovan lineage. Are there any rules about athletes having competed for more than one nation? Any time limits? Or is it as simple as – if the country wants to give you citizenship then you can compete for them?

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Hi Lauren. The rule is that you have to have been granted citizenship of your new country (not usually a problem) and you have to have not competed for your previous country for three years. Aaron Cook found a clever loophole by representing the Isle of Man for a while after London 2012.

    A lot of these cases are not particularly sympathetic but Cook’s is more sympathetic than most. He was treated appallingly by British Taekwondo which appeared to be retaliating for an earlier row in which he had spent some time training independently of them. His choice of Moldova also has a touching angle. He had several offers from much bigger nations which already have Olympic taekwondo programmes but he chose Moldova instead because he did not want to deny the opportunity to another fighter in the same way that he was denied in 2012.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s